What is Natural Law?


1. law of morality: a law of morality believed to be derived from human beings' inherent sense of right and wrong, rather than from revelation or the legislation produced by society 2. law of nature: a law that governs the behavior of natural phenomena 3. belief in universal justice system: the belief that general laws of nature can be applied as a system of justice for all societies, regardless of their individual culture or customs Natural law, or the law of nature (Latin: lex naturalis), is a system of law that is purportedly determined by nature, and so is universal.[1] Classically, natural law refers to the use of reason to analyze human nature — both social and personal — and deduce binding rules of moral behavior from it. Natural law is often contrasted with the positive law of a given political community, society, or state.[2] In legal theory, on the other hand, the interpretation of positive law requires some reference to natural law. On this understanding of natural law, natural law can be invoked to criticize judicial decisions about what the law says but not to criticize the best interpretation of the law itself. Some scholars use natural law synonymously with natural justice or natural right (Latin ius naturale),[3] while others distinguish between natural law and natural right.[1] Although natural law is often conflated with common law, the two are distinct in that natural law is a view that certain rights or values are inherent in or universally cognizable by virtue of human reason or human nature, while common law is the legal tradition whereby certain rights or values are legally cognizable by virtue of judicial recognition or articulation.[4] Natural law theories have, however, exercised a profound influence on the development of English common law,[5][full citation needed] and have featured greatly in the philosophies of Thomas Aquinas, Francisco Suárez, Richard Hooker, Thomas Hobbes, Hugo Grotius, Samuel von Pufendorf, John Locke, Francis Hutcheson, Jean Jacques Burlamaqui, and Emmerich de Vattel. Because of the intersection between natural law and natural rights, it has been cited as a component in the United States Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, as well as in the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Declarationism states that the founding of the United States is based on Natural law. Seminar Videos by Mark Passio:




A Film by Steve: Bates which took almost 9 months to make covering the multiple aspects and uses of the term, 'consent of the governed'. Something members of the World Freeman Society have revoked by Claim of Right. Governments, Police all operate by consent. They require your consent by acquiescence to make rulings, statutes, acts and war & taxes, all by your consent. Some things are good, we like Peace Officers keeping us safe, but do not consent to their revenue making activities. There are many good reasons to have a government, but we must remember who we are and who 'they' are. We are the Public and they are the Public Servants. And when they forget that, and start treating us like their property, it is our duty to inform others, help educate and hold accountable those whose actions do not reflect the mandate we as the people demand. "Consent Of The Governed: The Freeman Movement Defined" is nearly 3 hours long, and covers a wide range of topics that effect and hinder our human freedom when dealing with civil SERVANTS who seek to claim authority over us, so be prepared to set aside some educational viewing time ... however, I promise you, it will be time well spent. PDF Attachments: Tower of Babel (PDF) Right is Might (PDF) Additional Information on Natural Law